Filing a Chapter 7 Case to Save Your Business

A Chapter 13 case is often the preferred way to keep a sole proprietorship business alive. But can a regular Chapter 7 one ever do the same?

 

In my last blog I said that “if you own an ongoing business… which you intend to keep operating, Chapter 7 may be a risky option.” Why? Because Chapter 7 is a “liquidating bankruptcy,” so the bankruptcy trustee could make you surrender any valuable components of your business, thereby jeopardizing the viability of the business. But this deserves further exploration.

Your Assets in a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

When a Chapter 7 bankruptcy is filed, everything the debtor owns is considered to be part of the bankruptcy “estate.” A bankruptcy trustee oversees this estate. One of his or her primary tasks is to determine whether this estate has any assets worth collecting and distributing to creditors. Often there are no estate assets to collect and distribute because the debtor can protect, or “exempt,” certain categories and amounts of assets. The exempt assets continue to belong to the debtor and can’t be taken by the trustee for distribution to the creditors. The purpose of these “exemptions” is to let people filing bankruptcy keep a minimum amount of assets with which to begin their fresh financial start afterwards. In the vast majority of consumer Chapter 7 cases, the debtor can exempt everything in the estate, leaving nothing for the trustee to collect.  This is called a “no-asset” estate.

Business Assets in a Chapter 7 Case

If you own a sole proprietorship, are all the assets of that business exempt and protected? In other words, is the entire value of the business covered by exemptions, whether approaching the business as a “going concern” or broken up into its distinct assets.

Many very small businesses cannot be sold as an ongoing business because they are operated by and completely reliant for their survival on the services of its one or two owners.  In most such situations the business only has value when broken into its distinct assets.  So the Chapter 7 trustee must consider whether the debtor has exempted all of these business assets to put them out of the trustee’s reach.

The assets of a very small business may include tools and equipment, receivables (money owed by customers for goods or services previously provided), supplies, inventory, and cash on hand or in an account. Sometimes the business may also have some value in a brand name or trademark, a below-market lease, or perhaps in some other unusual asset.

Whether a business’ assets are exempt depends on the nature and value of those assets, and on the particular exemptions that the law provides for them. For example, a very small business may truly own nothing more than a modest amount of office equipment and supplies, and/or receivables. In these situations the applicable state or federal “tool of trade” or “wildcard” exemptions may protect all the business assets. You need to work conscientiously with your attorney to make certain that all the assets are covered.

So it is possible for a business-owning debtor to have a no-asset Chapter 7 case, potentially allowing the business to pass through the case unscathed.

The Potential Liability Risks of the Business

However, there is an additional issue: will the trustee allow the business to continue to operate during the (usually) three-four months that a no-asset case is open or instead try to force the business to be shut down because of its potential liability risks for the trustee?

How could the Chapter 7 trustee be able to shut down the business? Recall that everything that a debtor owns, including his or her business, becomes part of the bankruptcy estate.  As the technical owner—even if only temporarily—of the business, the trustee becomes potentially liable for damages caused by the business while the Chapter 7 case is open. For example, if a debtor who is a roofing subcontractor drops a load of shingles on someone during the Chapter 7 case, the estate, and thus the trustee, may be liable for the injuries.

The main factors that come into play are whether the business has sufficient liability insurance, and the extent to which the business is of the type prone to generating liabilities. There’s a lot of room for the trustees’ discretion in such matters, so knowing the particular trustee’s inclinations can be very important. That’s one of many reasons why a debtor needs to be represented by an experienced and conscientious attorney who knows all of the trustees on the local Chapter 7 trustee panel and how they deal with this issue.

Conclusion

In many situations it IS risky to file a Chapter 7 case when you want to continue operating a business. You need to be confident that the business assets are exempt from the bankruptcy estate, and that in your situation the trustee will not require the closing of the business to avoid any potential business liability.


Recent Posts