The Benefits of Both “Asset” and “No Asset” Chapter 7 After Closing Down a Business

A Chapter 7 case will wipe out all or most of your personal liability from a closed sole proprietorship, corporation, LLC, or partnership.

If you have closed down a business, or are about to do so, filing a Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy” case can be the best way of putting the debts of that business permanently behind you.

That Chapter 7 case will likely be a simpler one if you have a “no asset” case instead of an “asset” one. But an “asset case” may be worth the extra time it would likely take.

“Asset” and “No Asset” Chapter 7

Chapter 7 is sometimes called the liquidation form of bankruptcy. That usually does NOT mean that if you file a Chapter 7 case something you own will be liquidated, or sold. Most of the time you can keep everything you own. That’s if everything you own is “exempt”—included within a set of property “exemptions,” those types and amounts of property that are protected from your creditors. If everything is exempt, you would have a “no asset” case, so-called because the Chapter 7 trustee has no assets to collect.

In contrast, if you own something that is not exempt, and the trustee decides that it is worth liquidating and using the proceeds to pay a portion of your debts, then your case is an “asset case.”

The Quick “No Asset” and the Drawn Out “Asset” Case

Generally, a “no asset case” is simpler and quicker than an “asset case” because it avoids the asset liquidation and distribution-to-creditors process.

A simple “no asset” case can be completed in about three to four months after it is filed (assuming no other complications arise).  That’s in contrast to an “asset” case which always takes at least a few months more, easily a year or so, sometimes even multiple years.

Why does an “asset” case take so long? Because it can take time for a trustee to locate and take possession of an asset, sell it in a fair and open manner with notice to all interested parties, give creditors the opportunity to file claims to get paid out of the sale proceeds, for the trustee to object to any inappropriate claims, and then to distribute the funds as the law provides.  Each of these steps can take extra time. Especially if you have unusual or intangible asset, such as a disputed claim against a third party—a claim arising from an auto accident, for example—it can take a few years for the trustee to resolve and convert such a claim into cash, keeping the bankruptcy case open throughout this time.

The Potential Benefits of An “Asset” Case

If the trustee does have some asset(s) to collect from you, that can be turned to your advantages.  Two situations come to mind.

First, you may decide to close down your business and file a bankruptcy quite quickly after that in order to hand over to the trustee the headaches of collecting and liquidating the assets and paying the creditors in a fair and legally appropriate way. If you’ve been fighting for a long time to try to save your business, you may well find it not worth your effort to negotiate work-out terms with all the creditors. And you likely have no available money to pay an attorney to do this for you.

Second, you may particularly want your assets to go through the Chapter 7 liquidation process if the debts that the trustee will likely pay first out of your assets are ones that you especially want to be paid. The trustee pays creditors according to a legal list of priorities. For example, at the top of that list are child and spousal support arrearages, with certain tax claims not far behind. You may well want to take care of claims by your ex-spouse and/or children and the tax authorities. That’s especially true if you would continue to be personally liable on these obligations after the bankruptcy is over.


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